The Parking Lot Attendant by Nafkote Tamirat

The Parking Lot Attendant

A mesmerizing, indelible coming-of-age story about a girl in Boston's tightly-knit Ethiopian community who falls under the spell of a charismatic hustler out to change the worldA haunting story of fatherhood, national identity, and what it means to be an immigrant in America today, Nafkote Tamirat's The Parking Lot Attendant explores how who we love, the choices we make, and the places we’re from combine to make us who we are.The story begins o...


Details The Parking Lot Attendant

TitleThe Parking Lot Attendant
Author
Release DateMar 13th, 2018
PublisherHenry Holt and Co.
GenreFiction, Cultural, Africa, Literary Fiction
Rating

Reviews The Parking Lot Attendant

  • Janelle
    1970-01-01
    Thank you so much to Henry Holt for providing my free copy of THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat- all opinions are my own.The book opens with an unnamed narrator, a teenage girl from Boston, and her Ethiopian immigrant father, living on an undisclosed island. The story then switches back to life if Boston, prior to the island, where her parents are still together. Here, she starts hanging around a man named Ayale, a parking lot attendan...
  • Emily May
    1970-01-01
    Okay, I can't do it. This was torturous. I understand having to work hard for clever and complex works of literature, but I fear I might hurt myself if I try any harder to understand what the hell is going on in this book.I actually just can't make any sense of the plot. There's an unnamed narrator and her father moving from Boston to an - also unnamed - island commune. Then the book shifts and takes us back to Boston and their life leading up to...
  • Patrice Hoffman
    1970-01-01
    The Parking Lot Attendant by Nafkote Tamirat was captivating from page one. We're introduced to our narrator whose story begins on an undisclosed island where it's clear she and her father might be outcasts of sorts. This unnamed island has become home to the narrator and her father along with other Ethiopians that believed in Ayale.Our narrator recounts the events that led to her being on this island that was to serve as a sort of Utopia for her...
  • Mainlinebooker
    1970-01-01
    Rarely have I felt so wishy washy about a book. The blurb was intriguing and I was anxious to read the novel that began with an unnamed narrator and her father living on some island with the setting then switching to Boston. The second chapter provides information about the living situation of the narrator and her father and the third chapter focuses on the parking lot attendant. Unfortunately, the story fell short at this point. As the narrator ...
  • Dree
    1970-01-01
    This first novel demonstrates that this author has a lot of potential.The unnamed narrator is a female high school student in Boston, and an Ethiopian immigrant. She lives with her father, her mother's whereabouts being unknown (but last seen in the US). The narrator is a good student, a bit of a nerd, and has a sponsorship to attend college out of town (I guess this is like a scholarship?).She and her father both keep to themselves. Her best fri...
  • Jason Squire Fluck
    1970-01-01
    I’ve been a voracious reader as far back as I can remember. In second grade, I read the entire Black Stallion series by Walter Farley twice through and regretted the ending of every installment—all eighteen of them—two times over, wishing I could remain in the exciting world of fiction indefinitely. This feeling has repeated itself so many times since I could not count the number. My voracity, though, had a price. I always chose story over ...
  • AntKathy
    1970-01-01
    I received an unedited, pre-release copy of The Parking Lot Attendant from the publisher, gratis. All thoughts about the book are my own.As the synopsis of The Parking Lot Attendant reveals, the story is told by an unnamed young woman who has just recently become a resident on the island of B______., along with her father. The two of them are not welcome in the Utopian-styled community, and are on a sort of probation as the islanders decide wheth...
  • Afoma Umesi
    1970-01-01
    3.5 stars. The Parking Lot Attendant is narrated by a teenage girl whose name we’re not told. The book starts off on an undisclosed island only identified as B—. However, a couple of chapters in, our narrator takes us back to Boston to share how she and her father, both Ethiopian immigrants, ended up on B—. I was so disoriented at the start of this read, perhaps because everything felt so foreign and unidentified. Still, I pushed through an...
  • Jeff
    1970-01-01
    I got this book thru LibraryThing's Early Review program, in exchange for an honest review. This is a debut novel by Ethiopian-American author Nafkote Tamirat, and I enjoyed it quite a lot.The story starts out on an unnamed island with an unnamed narrator and her father, as they join a commune/cult? of some kind. They are not liked or wanted at this commune. As the reader you really don't know what's going on, other than that the girl is responsi...
  • R.Z.
    1970-01-01
    A fifteen-year-old girl and her father are living on an island somewhere off the coast of East Africa in an isolated colony of other Ethiopians who have little to eat, not much to do (although a few of them work in the larger society outside this strange group, and supply the few items that are needed to support them). How they got there and what drives these people to live this way is the flashback that provides the story. The father and daughte...
  • Renee
    1970-01-01
    Well.^ my exact reaction after completing this novel, which was so kindly gifted to me by Henry Holt & Co. in exchange for this unbiased review.I wanted so badly to find something to love in this confusing, messy debut; alas, until page 170 (out of 224), virtually nothing seemed to HAPPEN. The unnamed narrator reflects on her teenage years in Boston, living with her barely-substantial father, prior to their removal to an unnamed island to join a ...
  • Stephanie
    1970-01-01
    Thanks to Henry Holt for sending me a review copy!Quick summary: The novel opens with an unnamed teenage narrator and her father taking up residence in a commune on an undisclosed island. Soon, the narrative switches to their life back in Boston, where father and daughter live in near isolation until the narrator meets Ayale. She's quickly caught up in the whirlwind of his influence and pulled, naively, into his schemes.I had very different react...
  • Carla
    1970-01-01
    A rather odd book. I do like odd, but this was too jumbled for me. The narrator has no name, she and her father are on an Utopian-like island, awaiting to be accepted into this cult? commune? They are Ethiopian immigrants. This is the first part of the book and while I was a bit confused, I thought the writing was good. Then the middle part of the book takes a look at this same family back in Boston. This recounts how they ended up on this island...
  • Kim Overstreet
    1970-01-01
    The Parking Lot Attendant, the debut novel by Nafkote Tamirat is a genre-busting, fast paced story that begins in what seems to be a sort of commune in a place known only as B_______. The narrator, an American born teen girl who is never named, and her immigrant father are in limbo, awaiting a decision from a governing body. We can infer that something horrendous has led them to this place and this point. We travel back several years to Boston to...
  • Vivek Tejuja
    1970-01-01
    The Parking Lot Attendant is such a weird book at times and maybe because of all its oddities it works brilliantly for the reader in so many places. The plot is this: An unnamed young woman (a lot of unnamed narrators or protagonists in books these days), who has just recently become a resident on the island of B with her father tells the story of how things came to be. Of why she and her father had to come to this Utopian styled community, leavi...
  • Lauren
    1970-01-01
    I thought this was pretty awful. I'm no dummy, but I can't make heads or tails of the story . It's about a young Ethiopian woman living in Boston who falls under the spell of a charismatic older man who manages an outdoor lot downtown. There's much mystery and comings and goings and nothing seems realistic but it's not quite a fantasy either and by the end, everyone's on this Utopian community on a west Indian Island....At first I thought maybe i...
  • Kim
    1970-01-01
    The writing here was a bit jumbled in the beginning, but cleared up quickly. Overall the story was presented well and was an interesting read. I feel it lost steam 2/3 of the way through but delivered a startling ending. The hold Ayale had on the main character is both relatable and chillingly at times. Reading from this perspective about the plight of Ethiopian immigrants in New England was alarming. Growing up near D.C. the Ethiopian community ...
  • Danielle
    1970-01-01
    This book starts with a father and daughter showing up to live as the newest and somewhat unwelcome residents in a mysterious commune on a remote island. In the second chapter you're taken back to Boston where you begin to learn about their family and the Ethiopian community they are a part of and eventually as the book unfolds how they wound up on the island. In chapter three you finally meet the parking lot attendant, a fellow Ethiopian who is ...
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    I enjoyed this book....it was engaging & interesting, but I wouldn't call it an overly 'easy' read.....as it seemed like there were a lot of 'open conversations' going on that I had to occasionally/often go back a bit to reorient myself. I also didn't really understand the 'political' story line in it. It kind of 'starts at the end', & then tells how it got to that point......so that offers kind of a different presentation.....but that format doe...
  • Cathe Olson
    1970-01-01
    Despite an intriguing premise, I struggled to get through this book. It started off interestingingly, a girl and her father in a mysterious community on an unnamed remote island--but the book quickly switched to backstory where a teenage Ethiopian girl becomes enamored,even obsessesed, with a charismatic parking lot attendant and the book becomes all about him. The author knows how to put words together nicely, but there was a whole lot more "tel...
  • Susie | Novel Visits
    1970-01-01
    My Thoughts: I would have really liked this book had I stopped reading at about the 80% mark. At that point the book just went off the rails for me, but let’s begin with the good. The Parking Lot Attendant is a coming-of-age story told by its teenage Ethiopian protagonist. She’s had a rough life, living for her first six years with only her mother and since then only with her father. The father-daughter relationship shines in Tamirat’s debu...
  • Winthrop Smith
    1970-01-01
    Parents...Having worked in a homeless shelter, I felt for the children the most. The children were tied, are tied, to the choices, the actions, of parents, the adults. Here, a mother takes actions. A father takes actions. While it's not that the parents don't pay for their actions, so do the children, the child.
  • Joslyn Allen
    1970-01-01
    Review published: https://chronicbibliophilia.wordpress... “During my second week on the island, I woke up in the witching hour between night and day and saw the sky divided into pink, orange, and gold. The lines between each were jagged but distinct, and I realized that this probably happened all the time, I’d just been sleeping through it. It made me hope that I would have something to look forward to. When I indulge in this crepuscular glo...
  • Susan
    1970-01-01
    I hate to give a book - particularly an ARC - one star but I just did not enjoy this book at all. I didn't find the characters or story engaging or interesting. The motivation of the unnamed narrator was not clear and her obsession with Ayale didn't make sense to me.
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    I did not see that ending coming! The plot twists and turns were superbly done and the falling action and resolution, BRAVO! I would have never thought that Ayale would turn out to be such a conniving snake. My goodness!