Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race

'One of the most important books of 2017' Nikesh Shukla, editor of The Good ImmigrantA powerful and provocative argument on the role that race and racism play in modern Britain, by award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-LodgeIn 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitle...


Details Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race

TitleWhy I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race
ISBN9781408870556
Author
Release DateJun 1st, 2017
PublisherBloomsbury Circus
LanguageEnglish
GenreNonfiction, Race, Feminism, Politics, History
Rating

Reviews Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People about Race

  • Didi
    1970-01-01
    It was approximately five months ago that my book club was speaking about race since we were discussing Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. I found myself being the unique reference since I was the only black person in the room. https://browngirlreading.com/2017/08/...
  • TheSkepticalReader
    1970-01-01
    “When do you think we’ll get to an end point?”“There is no end point in sight,’ I reply. ‘You can’t skip to the resolution without having the difficult, messy conversation first. We’re still in the hard bit.” In 2014, Reni Eddo-Lodge made a blog post, from where emerges the book title, about why she does not want to talk to white people about race. The response was overwhelming, both from whites and people of color. Motivated by...
  • leynes
    1970-01-01
    I read Why I'm No Longer Talking To White People About Race based upon the recommendation of Yamini. So make sure to check out her review. Shutting up about racism creates the sort of silence that requires some to suffer so that others are comfortable. And it's definitely a book that I, myself, will start recommending to people. Reni Eddo-Lodge has a very distinct and clear voice. I liked that she displayed her thoughts in such a structured way, ...
  • Emma Wallace
    1970-01-01
    Beautiful, harrowing, emotional and raw; quite possibly the best book I have read all year! I write this review with an awareness that this book was never designed for my consumption or even education: this is such a personal account of Reni's experience and the historical experience of all POC in Britain and that connection is deeply felt in Reni's direct, emotive prose. I have felt a plethora of emotions while reading this book and have been sh...
  • Kaitlin
    1970-01-01
    This is a book I picked up on audible as I had heard pretty rave things about the author and her work. I was definitely not disappointed as the audio version is actually narrated by the author, and this lends a lot more to the book than I think reading it would have, because it feels incredibly approachable but also very personal. This is Reni's experiences over her life with specifically British racism. She questions white privilege, naivety, sa...
  • Drackemoor
    1970-01-01
    A book full of underlying hate and racist prejudice against white people. Why would, such a despicable text is allowed to be published is beyond me.It starts with its title, which is offensive enough, and gets worse from there. If you want to see what the real racism is, read this book.
  • Meike
    1970-01-01
    Don’t let the book’s title irritate you: In this text, Reni Eddo-Lodge does nothing but talking about race, especially to white people, and she calls upon everyone to challenge the structural set-up that allows racism to thrive. From black history in Britain (which is obviously not taught in schools, a reality that deprives both colored and white kids of knowledge about important aspects of British history), to structural racism, the intersec...
  • Mohammed P Aslam
    1970-01-01
    Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote in the Guardian (June 2017) where she stated, White privilege is a manipulative, suffocating blanket of power that envelopes everything we know, like a snowy day.Why wouldn’t we wish to talk to white people about race, this would be an automatic response to the title of this book from any normal white person and many black people too. This book is certainly a very edifying as much as an instructive book by all accounts and...
  • Theo
    1970-01-01
    A book all white people should read. If you assume this book is racist then you'd be wrong. It lays out a lot of facts about how race affects people who aren't white in the UK that are interesting and damning. Luckily the author's writing is brisk and highly readable. Unlike many factual books where it feels the author has a word count to achieve, this is always pithy and to the point, covering a range of points without repeating the same ideas o...
  • Mich
    1970-01-01
    I would be lying to you if i told you i didnt sticky-note every other page. Racism is alive and well in Britain and this book here is ready 👏 ta 👏 give 👏 you 👏 the 👏 facts 👏. I wish there was a miniature version i could carry around in my bag Im not even joking. How does racism present itself in 21st century Britain? What are the intersections between racism and misogyny? Between race and poverty? Why is the scarcity mentality f...
  • Natalie (weneedhunny)
    1970-01-01
    “Why I’m no longer talking to white people about race” is an ambitious, biting, and clear account of racism in contemporary Britain. Lodge divides her discussion into different sections like class, feminism and intersectionality, criminal justice, and politics; to discuss both general trends and problems as well as eying these problems through specific examples of structural racism. One of the most important lessons given in this book, I th...
  • Tadas Talaikis
    1970-01-01
    This should be interesting, because I don't see "color" and I am constantly seeing some racists out there, in the wild. I want to understand their idiotic "logic". Now I have only one hypothesis, backed by various research pieces, - when people live too well, they lose empathy, because it's no longer economically profitable.What I think after reading it. Yes, racism exists, "blindness to race" exists, but at the end this book goes too far with ju...
  • Tim
    1970-01-01
    This book is so important! From the history of racism in the UK to questions of intersectional feminism and class, this book shows up the network of structural racism and how it is upheld. I simply cannot recommend this enough!
  • Liz Tyson
    1970-01-01
    Everyone should read this book.
  • Suswati
    1970-01-01
    My reaction to this book was FINALLY someone is discussing the intersectionality between feminism, classism, and the British identity with race and racism. Having spoken to her personally about this during one of her talks, it's rather refreshing to hear it included. Absolutely current and relevant to society especially in the aftermath of the Brexit referendum. I listened to this in one go on Audible, nodding and shouting in agreement throughout...
  • Anthe
    1970-01-01
    A few parts, especially the chapter on class, were a bit too uk-specific for me to completely grasp, but this is a very necessary read.
  • Asim Qureshi
    1970-01-01
    This book is important for many reasons, and while it is written very much from the perspective of Reni Eddo-Lodge's experience as a black woman growing up in the UK, there is much about it that I recognise. particularly pertinent in the book is her presentation of white privilege and the way in which discussions that step outside of what is considered to be acceptable by liberals results in demonisation. I have a great deal of both sympathy and ...
  • Alex Strick van Linschoten
    1970-01-01
    Essential reading.
  • Gem (Glimpsing Gembles Blog)
    1970-01-01
    I read this book hoping to learn more, but I was disappointed. Although there were a lot of well researched, important, and heartbreaking facts, I wanted more about what we can all do to improve the situation. Maybe a follow up book would be great to build on the facts and history provided in this book so as to educate readers about how we can move forward.
  • Julia
    1970-01-01
    On the rather short space of about 270 pages she tackles topics like intersectional feminism and the link between the British class-system and racism.I especially liked the parts about why Eddo-Lodge thinks color-blindness or the idea of post-racism is so problematic and harmful because it cuts short any attempt of debate. For me, the most interesting and most revealing part though were the chapters about the history of structural racism in the U...
  • Jamrock
    1970-01-01
    So good, so important and so relevant that I read it twice, three times if you include the audio book. The author smashes the ball out of the park with this intensely critical essay on race and racism. I remember being confused by the title (and not even that clear after Googling the original 'blogpost that this stemmed from) and who the book was aimed at. After all, I'm as far from racist as you can get, aren't I? I'd later regret making that bl...
  • Michael
    1970-01-01
    In response to a one-star review:A book full of analysis of the underlying hate and racist prejudice against black people in majority white society. Why such an insightful text took so long to be published is beyond me. It starts with its title, which is eye-catching and thought provoking, and the author carefully explains her meaning in a well-considered and personal way. If you want to see what real structural racism is, read this book.It's ea...
  • Ada
    1970-01-01
    I finished reading Reni Eddo-Lodge’s Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People about Race, only to hear a few days later that it has been nominated for the Baillie Gifford Prize for nonfiction. It’s very exciting to hear it – as the book deserves to benefit from the extra publicity.The book‘s title, Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race, has been the source of much discussion and anxiety. I think it’s excellent in tha...
  • Betty
    1970-01-01
    This is a thought provoking text and although Eddo -Lodge is describing institutionalised racism in Britain, it absolutely applies to Australia. Her chapter on "What is White Privilege?" is particularly important as she points out that "Neutral is white. The default is white... And white privilege is an absence of the consequences of racism." She adds: "There is an unattributed definition of racism that defines it as prejudice plus power." As a w...
  • Jess
    1970-01-01
    I received a galley of this book via Bloomsbury and NetGalley. This has not impacted my thoughts or opinions.This book blew me away. I found myself highlighting and bookmarking full sections of this book. As an American, I read predominantly books about the experience of black Americans and American POC. It was refreshing – yet alarmingly similar – to read about Britain's own complicated and horrific history of oppression, racism, and slavery...
  • Dabarai
    1970-01-01
    This book really delivers. I wanted to read it, didn't expect it to be so easy to digest, persuasive and accurate. It talks about black history in UK and covers things like, systemic, institutionalised racism, white feminism, color blindness etc - and it makes you want to agree but also shake your head in disbelief and it can make you cringe too. The essential read for Black History Month.
  • Lois Clark-Johnston
    1970-01-01
    This was so good. So much information about the British BPOC and NBPOC civil rights movement.
  • Ned Summers
    1970-01-01
    Very important and necessary book
  • Reader28
    1970-01-01
    Everyone should read this book.
  • Gabriela Pop
    1970-01-01
    an essential must-read